Reread the paragraph below from “Revenge of the Geeks.” That’s not to say, of course, that popularity in high school necessarily

Reread the paragraph below from “Revenge of the Geeks.”

That’s not to say, of course, that popularity in high school necessarily leads to mediocrity or worse in adulthood. But neither is there necessarily something wrong with a student merely because he is excluded by classmates. We don’t view a saxophonist as musically challenged if he can’t play the violin. He’s just a different kind of musician. A sprinter is still an athlete even if she can’t play basketball. She’s a different kind of athlete. Similarly, we might acknowledge that students who don’t follow the popular crowd’s lead aren’t any less socially successful; they’re just a different kind of social.
What claim does the author make in this paragraph? How does she support the claim? Is her reasoning strong? Are the connections clear and logical? Explain your evaluation.

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